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Author Topic: Two rotary tables, cutting a bevel gear -- octoidal tooth generation.  (Read 110 times)
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JustinO
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« on: September 17, 2018, 01:11:10 PM »

This is a short video of a pair of rotary tables rolling a conical blank against a virtual crown gear with an embedded flycutter . If the tooth faces of the virtual crown gear are planer/great circles, the tooth faces of the generated gear will be octoidal.

https://youtu.be/RxRbuPIKu6I

--Justin
« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 01:17:28 PM by JustinO » Logged
ArtF
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« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2018, 01:46:40 PM »

Well done! The Gcode must have been complex to imagine as it was written..

Art
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JustinO
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« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2018, 03:40:31 PM »

Art,
The Gcode is shockingl y simple once you've worked it out, but it feels impossibl e at first.

The hard part is setting up -- getting the rotary axes to intersect, and touching off at that virtual point of intersect ion.

Then there is the minor subject of having to build the machine!

This is a paying job. They're paying decent money, but it is more work than it is worth. It is a nice project, and a worthy cause.
Schanck Observato ry Times
https://www.facebook.com/670361143169824/

I used your software to make wire frames, rotate them around, then photoshop them over the not so good photograp hs of the original gears. It helped to confirm the toothcoun t....

Someday, I'll be able to actually feed myself making gears!

--Justin
odhner.co m
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ArtF
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« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2018, 05:54:46 PM »

Justin:

   You did well. I guess its like so many other operation s
in more than 2 dimension s, the hardest part is the concept,
gets easier in implement ation..

Art
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Mooselake
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« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2018, 02:21:06 PM »

Impressiv e!

I looked up octoidal bevel gears, and while I still don't understan d the descripti on the Wikipedia bevel gear page has a picture of a double bevel helical gear in case Art gets bored  Smiley

How do you like that CNC Sherline?  I'm thinking that the new southern shop needs a small CNC mill and have been looking at that, a Taig, or maybe a DIY SX2 conversio n (the Delta metal shaper has preempted a new machine up north, it's making chips!).  Like all Mooselab projects it'll take way longer than it should to actually do something

Kirk
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JustinO
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2018, 10:51:03 AM »

Hi Kirk,
I think Sherlines are a great value. There is always a glut in the second hand market. Technical schools get grants and buy lots of them, then they are auctioned off when the next grant comes in ten years later. The huge supply, and the interchan geability is great. If you break something or wear it out (I never have), you can buy a replaceme nt easily. The used Sherlines I have bought are worth as much as they were when I bought them. Except for my first machines, I always try to buy Sherline stuff used, and only buy new if the parts I need are unavailab le or expensive on the used market. One thing about CNC is that I have been able to sell some of my accessori es -- radius cutter, threading, and have hugely expanded what I can do:
https://youtu.be/AXiFeOCwV28
--Justin
odhner.co m
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