GearHeads Corner
September 21, 2017, 12:32:54 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Clayton Boyer's Marigold  (Read 200 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
John T
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 491



View Profile WWW
« on: July 24, 2017, 08:23:54 AM »

I hope you'll forgive me for posting this - it doesn't have a single gear in the whole mechanism so gearotic had no involveme nt it its construct ion - its just a fun, eye catching build.


* IMG_7433.jpg (2258.85 KB, 4032x3024 - viewed 69 times.)
Logged

1% inspirati on 99% try, try again
Mooselake
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 505



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2017, 06:00:49 PM »

That looks pretty amazing, John!

Is that an architect ure textbook in the backgroun d?

Kirk
Logged
ArtF
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 4698



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2017, 08:37:54 PM »

John:

 I think it looks great. Nice vanes. Smiley



Art
Logged

Thanks, have fun,
Art
John T
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 491



View Profile WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2017, 07:56:16 AM »

Good eye!

Its always difficult to get a perfect backgroun d - so yes the book is "Architect ure - residenti al drawing an design" by Clois E. Kicklight er copyright 1976.

I've used it hundreds of times to find the "standard" design for the angle on the back of a chair or the working triangle of and effective kitchen, acceptabl e rise and run on stairs, etc. etc..  Its always been personal stuff but very useful.

John
Logged

1% inspirati on 99% try, try again
BobL
Gearotic Motion
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 774



View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2017, 10:36:09 AM »

excellent work John,  looks awesome
Logged

Gearotic Motion
Bob
Mooselake
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 505



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2017, 04:08:29 PM »

the book is "Architect ure - residenti al drawing an design" by Clois E. Kicklight er copyright 1976.

I've used it hundreds of times to find the "standard" design for the angle on the back of a chair or the working triangle of and effective kitchen, acceptabl e rise and run on stairs, etc. etc..  Its always been personal stuff but very useful.
My $5 used copy of the 1981 edition arrived today.  Not sure the chapter on T squares and erasing (still remember those...) is too useful, but the standard dimension s, room sizes, beam loading, etc. is what I needed.  Thanks for the reference!

My middle girl has a Masters of Architect ure from MIT, but when I've asked her these kinds of questions she just tells me that's for the engineer to worry about.  Scary.

Kirk
Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!