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Author Topic: I want to make a clock  (Read 232 times)
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mdov
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« on: April 06, 2017, 09:38:00 PM »

I want to make a clock. The clock will be made of plywood and american cherry if appropria te to be hanged on the wall with exposed gears.  Please help/direct me where to find plans for such clock?
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ArtF
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2017, 09:45:27 PM »

Hi

  You may want to search for Clayton Boyer designs, if your looking for plans
for a complete clock. You can design your own, but it does take a bit of study
and experimen tation, so it may be better to go with a predesign ed clock plan
for your first, a clock can be a challenge ..

Art
 
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Thanks, have fun,
Art
mdov
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2017, 10:00:09 PM »

Hello again after four months absence.

I still want to make a clock! Just read in FAQ page, Q no 8; "...The clock project included with GM is a tested and functioni ng clock, and we're happy to share the experienc e to ensure you can build something you'll be proud to show off."

Where to find this clock project, please?
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ArtF
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« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2017, 06:40:57 AM »

Hi:

 Open the file Clock2.gt h in the GearData folder. If you created a new folder
for your data, youll find that file in C:\Gearotic Thoughts\GearData\Clock2.gth

 This is a working gear train for a clock.. Its from the original Gearotic version 1.0,
so it hasn't been updated. Were I to build another clock, Im not so sure Id use that particula r
one though, I made that from wood, and it eventuall y became a good looking plant stand,
but I think if you want to build a clock your better off with a Clayton Boyer design
or designing from scratch to match the dimension s you need. Id suggest this because while
I don't mind changing things in the design as I build it, if its your first your better off with a
design that has been made by enough people that modificat ions are not required.

  Its a matter of how you like to build things, I start with a numerical ly solid geartrain,
and as I build if I hit a snag I will redesign particula r gears, or casing to make things
look the way I have it in my mind. For many though, better for a first build to have a design
thats blueprint ed and built by many. You can use gearotic to create new DXF's for any gears in it
to make it yours with new spoke designs and such however, but unless you have some experienc e
dealing with builds of clock trains, Id start with a Boyer.

 Check the clock2.gt h file though, it shows what your looking at doing,

 
Art
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Art
mdov
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2017, 06:28:27 PM »

Dear Art
Thank you so much for detail explanati on and your uplifting sense of humour.
Hopefully, after few years I will have something to report about my plant stand or perhaps even about my newly build clock.
Michael Dovesen
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ArtF
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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2017, 09:00:26 PM »

Michael:

   A sense of humor is indispens able in such things. I dont think Ive ever
built anything in the process of which I haven't questione d my sanity. Building
a clock is a good way of learning your limitatio ns.. among many other things..

Smiley

Art
 
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Art
mphil
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« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2017, 04:09:36 AM »

Hi
For me I'd start to visualise what you want your clock to look like. Remember that most clocks are based upon similar factors i.e. an escape wheel, decide on what type you'd like here as this is an area you can go quite visule. You may need two or possibly three more wheels one of these to be used as the driving wheel.
Once you've visualise d your design perhaps draw a little sketch.

I'm designing a clock that only require three main wheels plus the motion work. The third wheel being the driving wheel where a counter balanced arm pulls the train very slightly as it doesn't take much force at all. The counter arm resets about every 20 degrees or so. This way you can play around with your design and have a bit of fun.

The important thing is getting the motion work to turn at the correct increment s. Gearotic has everythin g you need to get you there. Otherwise google known toothe counts for clocks there's many options. Once you have the wheel tooth and pinion counts use these in Gearotic to generate your clock, I started with my deadbeat escape wheel as I like to make these a focal point so mine is 100mm with a large span for the pallets. I also went for a large wheel diameter so the tooth counts stayed the same but I altered the module within Gearotic until I got what I wanted visually.

I found using Gearotic very useful and I have to say very good. You can use this to generate the file output you require , I used DXF. and then opened  this up in Fusion to manipulat e my design even further. I also have the benefit of a 3D printer so I'm proving the concept before going to laser print where I'll use a mix of Acrylic and Aluminium .

As art says play around with your design have a bit of fun if you like or just keep the design simple but remember the important thing is telling the time so the correct teeth counts are somewhere you ought to start looking in to.

Mark
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