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Author Topic: A Musical Machine  (Read 3845 times)
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kit
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« on: October 28, 2016, 10:17:33 PM »

I saw this and imediatel y though of Art  Wink

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvUU8joBb1Q

Kit
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ArtF
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2016, 07:12:04 AM »

very cool...

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Mooselake
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« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2016, 06:05:26 PM »

And there's a couple videos on how it works, the first one says all the gear templates are available (I didn't look), and were designed with Mathias's Gear Generator.  FWIW, I cut my first CNC gears with that, and it's limitatio ns were what lead me to Gearotic some years back.

Kirk
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kit
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« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2016, 07:14:17 PM »

You can tell Art's had a bit more experiene with software than Mathias. I do like the rest of his site though. The Pantorout er is an especiall y clever machine.

My wife thinks I should build one of these music machines. I thought it was the perfect project for automatio n with Auggie. Almost as exciting as a cake icing machine!

Kit
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ArtF
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2016, 07:29:30 AM »

>>You can tell Art's had a bit more experiene with software than Mathias


  Im no master programme r by any means. I do have experienc e though, I started programmi ng
in 1975 ..  back when an apple was something you eat. Smiley ..

Art
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Mooselake
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« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2016, 09:20:36 AM »

You make me feel even older.  I started programmi ng in 1969, my high school math teacher started a 7am pre-school programmi ng class that used mimeograp hed Fortran II manuals to teach a Fortran IV class.  While we were told we'd get to run them on Wayne State's 360/67 that never happened, so the friendly class competiti on to write the shortest program to calculate an average was all desk checked and debugged.   I was tied for first place.  Some years later I audited an OS architect ure class at Wayne that discussed the same machine, but I think it was gone by then.  I don't claim to be in Art's class though.

Back then an apple was something you drank, after it went through a cider press and was smashed flat.

Kirk
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ArtF
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« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2016, 10:20:09 AM »

Kirk:

  lol, I was 10 while you learned fortran, by the time I was 15, computers were still seen
only on startrek. . I did get to use the cyber 670 at the local universit y, but learned to program
in a language called APL first on a governmen t computer terminal put in as a test at our
local highschoo l.
   They may all be old and mostly dead languages, but they did tend to teach you a lot
of tricks to keep up your sleeve. Ive lost count of the number of languages I programme d in
over the years, mostly forgotten, but I think they all play a part in the way you look at
a problem you need to solve.

Art



     
         
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Mooselake
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« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2016, 12:07:07 PM »

I was 16 so, not too far ahead of you.   It's a toss up whether or not I've written more Fortran or assorted assembly languages over the years, but you can abuse Fortran into almost anything.  I did a non-procedural report language to Cobol translato r in it, cranking out tens of thousands of lines (Cobol's pretty wordy) for a Univac 1108 and room full of twirling tape drives.  At the time I was the young hotshot programme r, proud that my generated programs ran considera bly faster then the long-term Cobol programme r's version of their biggest (12 hours of CPU time) report.  Today I'd be a lot more diplomati c, having reached old-fart status myself.  In the early 80s I went to a company that ran a network of ATMs (my only job that actually punched out money) on HP minis, all programme d in Fortran.

I played with APL in the early 70s using a funny character to 2 tty character mapping, on more Univac gear (1106s and 1110 at JSC), but never did anything particula rly serious.  The interpret er came from the Universit y of Maryland, a big 1100 series developme nt school in the early 70s.  I might still have a copy of Iverson's book stashed away somewhere .

I likewise have no idea how many programmi ng languages I've used over the years.  Unlike you I mostly reminisce, with a bit of C or whatever on the side.

For your next demo maybe you could reproduce the music machine in gearotic Smiley

Kirk
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ArtF
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« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2016, 02:06:56 PM »

>>or your next demo maybe you could reproduce the music machine in gearotic

  I dont think I have enough time left.. Smiley

art
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John T
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« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2016, 09:26:58 PM »

Do any of you go back far enough to remember when "computers" were hard wired by the programme r??

John
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1% inspirati on 99% try, try again
ArtF
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« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2016, 09:45:24 PM »

Now that luckily, I didnt have to do. And now we stand on the verge of quantum computers and q-bits. Adding a single bit to a quantum
computer increases its power by a factor of 2. Programmi ng world's gonna get a lot weirder eventuall y. Of course that could be like the
personal jetpacks they promised us in the 60's.. they, like so many things are always 10 years away.. Smiley

Art
 
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kit
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« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2016, 11:14:58 PM »

Crikey, I put up a video of a wooden music-maker and we're all off on a computer languages nostalgia fest  Cheesy It's actually quite good fun to go off at tangents like that, it's what I enjoy so much about my other favourite forum over at Timescape s.org.

I was 11 when you were learning fortran Kirk and my English grammar school was not exactly the most up to date education al establish ment. I don't think any of the teachers had uttered modern words or phrases like 'Wireless Telegraph y', 'NAND' or 'OR' by the time I left aged 18. I did have a grasp of Newtonian mechanics and Young's Modulus though. I also knew how to use a soldering iron courtesy of not spending enough time on the homework I was supposed to be doing.

And here I am now, also with 'old-fart' status, programmi ng an Arduino to work a weaving loom.

Kit
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ArtF
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« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2016, 07:26:34 AM »

Just goes to show there is a linearity in everythin g..Its true, many of us are in or reaching for
"Old Fart Status", which is good and bad. Really, it means we're now near the top of the heap.
as it means we've gone through all the prerequis ites life had to offer. Usually in an order which
does all or most of the following ..

"Born to Run." - your wrinkled, ugly and somehow adorable.
"Raring to Go." - your no longer wrinkled or adorable and beginning to annoy your teachers.
"Genius in training" -optional (
"Entering life with promise." - your teachers are greatly relieved your entering life, as it means your leaving school.
"Your Country thanks you." -optional (Your Sargent is greatly relieved as well, as it means your leaving the service.)
"Establish ing oneself" - Can I please have a job I like. "No, you'll take what I give you"

While ( !competant)
{
   "ReExtabli shing yourself"   
   "Proving incompeta nce" -optional
}

Random(1) < .2 ?  "Hate my job" : "Love my job"
"Retiremen t"
"Wtf do I do now.?"
"Old Fart Status"

    Happily, its my understan ding "Old Fart Status" lasts forever with increasin g levels
of happiness . (That may be a mental effect of being an "Old Fart" though...)

Art








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BobL
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« Reply #13 on: November 01, 2016, 10:11:05 AM »

Now that you guys are reminisci ng about the past, and making us all feel older, we can't deny the engineeri ng it took to make Wintergat an the Marble Machine happen, awesome piece of work.

Cheers
Bob
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Bob
Mooselake
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« Reply #14 on: November 01, 2016, 09:20:01 PM »

Do any of you go back far enough to remember when "computers" were hard wired by the programme r??
You betcha!  Back in high school, must have been about 1968, they did morning attendenc e with an IBM 403 accountin g machine that was programme d with a plugboard .  They let me borrow and study the "programme d learning" programmi ng guides, but were afraid to give me a spare plugboard to practice on.  The 403 was a 407 with the drive motor running at half speed.

Michigan Tech had a 407 in the hall outside the IBM 360/44 lab that had last been used to list cards decks, but it was defunct by the time I got there in the summer of '69 (some partied that summer, I started engineeri ng school...).

Kirk
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