GearHeads Corner
December 14, 2019, 08:58:59 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Accurate wooden clocks!  (Read 3418 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
ArtF
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5477



View Profile
« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2019, 06:47:01 AM »

>>At last I have a reliable (shouldn't say that out loud!)

  True, I try not too, I spend too much time tinkering and not
enough time building. .

  In hardwoods that would look awesome..

Art
Logged
kit
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79



View Profile
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2019, 07:31:22 AM »

This video shows an experimen t with cutting a more industria l looking gear from Jarrah. I wouldn't do the two sided cutting again but it was an interesti ng test. The router has changed quite a lot since this video was made about a year ago.

Kit

https://vimeo.com/284841202
Logged
Mooselake
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 604



View Profile
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2019, 10:14:35 AM »

My day job involves maintaini ng a machine that generates a million watts of wireless waves

The world's biggest microwave oven?  Tesla power station?

I'd guess either a big city FM tv or radio station (do they even get that big?),radar, or a hot fusion reactor.  Of course, I'm just a moose in a swamp...

More important ly, does it have dancing monkeys?

Kirk
Logged
Mooselake
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 604



View Profile
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2019, 10:33:25 AM »

@kit, is that a 4 or 500w air cooled spindle?  More impressiv e than I would have thought, it might work for my also deep-freezer CNC Rose engine lathe project. Essential ly all the parts are sitting in the northern mooseshop, while I'm stuck in Florida until summer next year.  Something about when you have the time you don't have the resources ...

A long time ago Chuck posted a CNC pie wedge gear blank program that would allow you to control which way the grain ran in non-plywood gear teeth.  I seem to recall a discussio n somewhere about making the blanks 2 or more plys, which might help control warping and strengthe n them; of course that's another layer of work.

I like your shop in the backgroun d of your videos!

Kirk
Logged
kit
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79



View Profile
« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2019, 07:33:35 PM »

kirk,

Google 'VLF' and you'll get the idea. No dancing monkeys I'm afraid, just a lot of kangaroos .

That spindle was 400W but I managed to shear the shaft on it so I've now moved on to the popular DIY builders choice of a 2.2kW (3HP) water cooled version. That has the advantage of taking 1/2 inch tools if I want to do some heavy cutting and is very quiet.

I looked at the pie segmented idea myself but thought I'd give it a go without. The Jarrah coped quite well but I think it will be necessary for most woods, especiall y for smaller, thinner teeth than my test. Having done some segmented wood turning in the past I realise that how well the pieces fit together will be a  good indicatio n of the CNC machines cutting accuracy. Sourcing materials is my biggest headache. Apart from construct ion grade Jarrah (still useful stuff) my nearest hardwood suppliers are 1300Km away in Perth.

I had to Google 'rose engine', some wonderful ly intricate machines out there. When do we get to see the results from yours?

Kit
Logged
Mooselake
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 604



View Profile
« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2019, 01:16:57 PM »

I live in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, including during the ELF days.  It seems the general populace has no understan ding of RF; we had a hysteria campaign when they wanted to build a 100W cell tower a few hundred feet from an elementar y school from people with handheld cell phones and home WiFi.  The High/Middle school is around a quarter mile from a 100KW FM station but nobody's concerned .  I'm not sure if that's because, or in spite of, it's being Country Western.

I think it'll still be a while until I actually build a Rose Engine, moose must be great procrasti nators and get distracte d by shop building projects instead of in shop projects.  There's relativel y easy Jack Chick Rose engine plans online, and I've looked at (but never pulled the parts trigger) at the popular MDF Rose engine.  The commercia l versions are a bit rich (Lindow thinks $20K US is moderatel y priced although they have somewhat less expensive starter versions).  Beall (a maker of great stuff) has the Pen Wizard Ornamenta l Pen Lathe for around $300 that I've come close to clicking the buy button on several times, but it's only a small subset of a real Rose engine and it's hard to find any reviews from actual users.

Now that I have plenty of spare time, at least for things that can be done sitting on a stool, the mooseshop and all the supplies are a couple thousand miles away.
Logged
kit
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79



View Profile
« Reply #21 on: June 25, 2019, 11:09:40 PM »

Kirk,

You sound like me! The start of the 5G mobile phone roll-out in Australia has brought up a new round of health scares on Facebook about radiation from the base stations. I heard a radio interview just a few days ago with a man from ARPANSA, the Australia n regulator for all things wireless, trying to allay peoples fears and point out that '5G' is just a new trade name for an existing technolog y.

When I still lived in the UK during the early 2000's I saw a TV news report showing people protestin g about the dangers of a new tower near their homes. In the backgroun d of the interview was a young woman holding a baby. During the interview she was using her mobile phone and even holding it to the baby's head! As a BBC transmitt er engineeri ng lecturer at the time I wondered how soon they'd catch on to the fact that we'd been radiating far higher field strengths at people for many decades. As I keep pointing out to anyone who'll listen, the only significa nt radiation hazard faced by the general public is the big yellow round thing in the sky. Especiall y for those of us who live in the tropics.

Igorance is bliss. Sadly ignorance is also an increasin gly powerful and persuasiv e force in the world.

Re the clock: I've designed and made the printed circuit board but have to wait for a new hot air bit for my gas soldering iron to arrive in the post before I can finish assemblin g it. It's a surface mount design (I can't stand drilling all those holes!!) so the conventio nal iron doesn't work too well. I have sorted out which bit's of wood I'm using for the wheels though and am finishing the design of the base now I know the size of the circuit board.
Logged
kit
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79



View Profile
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2019, 11:46:38 PM »

A bit more progress on the clock. The circuit board was designed using 'DipTrace' software and printed using the DIY favourite 'toner-transfer' method. Soldering is completed and it is now sucessful ly driving the prototype mechanism powered by a standard USB wall wart. That was a key aim so I'm very pleased. As you can see from the pictures below, a few mods were required to get everythin g working correctly so the finished board is not quite as profesion al looking as we might wish.

My attempt at cutting a wheel from a non-segmented piece of hardwood (no idea what species) led to broken teeth where the grain was tangentia l rther than radial. The wood was very hard and tight-grained but also brittle which is what I'd feared. I'll have to rely on the locally available Jarrah as cutting segments with the CNC router is very wasteful and that's the only stuff I have enough of for the job.

Does anyone on the forum have any experienc e using 'Cactus Juice' impregnat ing resin for hardening and stabilisi ng wood? I'm wondering if it's worth experimen ting with resin hardened pine as that's the most plentiful material I have locally available . One day we're going to retire to Tasmania where a wide range of lovely timbers will be readilly available, but until then...

Kit


* CircularClock-7075.jpg (107.57 KB, 800x514 - viewed 37 times.)

* CircularClock-7092.jpg (126.35 KB, 800x533 - viewed 40 times.)
« Last Edit: June 30, 2019, 11:52:38 PM by kit » Logged
ArtF
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5477



View Profile
« Reply #23 on: July 02, 2019, 08:59:07 AM »

Kit:

 Havent used stabalize r yet myself, but yeah, grain is an issue. I have done
smaller things by gluing and pressing a few sheets of 1/16" veneer together
with grain alternati ng.. gives it stability

 Art
Logged
kit
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79



View Profile
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2019, 08:30:36 PM »

Art,
That's an idea, a high grade ply just where it's needed.

The wheels are coming out well using six segments with radial grain for each but the wastage is criminal. I don't have a bandsaw here, not enough space, so I'm having to use the CNC machine to cut the segments from 19mm stock, which is wasteful in itself, and then turn 10 of the 19 millimetr es into sawdust. Not to a work procedure to be repeated!

On the upside, the Jarrah produces very nice results so I think I'll just have to throw my wife and her weaving looms out of her half of the shed and buy that bandsaw afer all!

Kit
Logged
ArtF
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5477



View Profile
« Reply #25 on: July 04, 2019, 10:42:02 AM »

Kit

 Just press the veneers hard with lots of pressure and they come out as pretty
high quality plywood.

Art
Logged
Mooselake
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 604



View Profile
« Reply #26 on: July 04, 2019, 11:05:20 AM »

I'll just have to throw my wife and her weaving looms out of her half of the shed and buy that bandsaw afer all!
Might be easier to get a benchtop bandsaw and hang it from the ceiling beams with a pulley system.  Otherwise you might end up living in it, based on how attached my wife is to her looms and spinning wheels.  Rarely used but still critical, I'm, told.

Maybe expand the shed, double what you need you'll only get half.  It would be an excuse to get a track saw (smaller than a table saw...), or maybe a Maslow CNC (bigger, but it could become one wall)

Kirk
« Last Edit: July 06, 2019, 08:26:17 AM by Mooselake » Logged
kit
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79



View Profile
« Reply #27 on: July 05, 2019, 10:13:48 PM »

Kirk,
Much as I love Heath Robinson, I'm not sure I want to plan my workshop using his principle s. Doubling the available space will have to wait until we retire to a place where expertise in old fashioned wireless telegraph y is not in demand but real estate is significa ntly cheaper. I'm trying not to count the hours, days, weeks, months, years until then.

Clocks and weaving are equally addictive but don't always work well in the same space. There are plans to convert space in the house from rarely occurring activitie s (entertain ing guests, watching televisio n) to accommoda te the textile arts which keep my wife busy. This means some mildly dust generatin g activitie s can move out of the small walled-off area of the shed that is MINE and a bandsaw and a few other useful items might just have somewhere to live.

Kit
Logged
kit
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 79



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2019, 06:58:26 AM »

Work and other domestic duties have been getting in the way of clock developme nts recently, though one of the main consumers of non-work time has been the previousl y predicted move of looms and other thread based activitie s out of the studio (aka 'shed') into the house.  Wife now has a very impressiv e work room and I have room for the bandsaw, but might have to wait until Christmas for it to materiali se.

The creative process rumbles on.

Kit
Logged
ArtF
Administrator
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 5477



View Profile
« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2019, 07:42:17 AM »

 Kit:

 Life does tend to intrude.

Art
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!