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Author Topic: ticker prototype  (Read 3328 times)
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Ian
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« on: April 17, 2015, 09:59:50 AM »

short video of my ticker

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYhEp9Qu70E

Would like to get more spins per flick !
Are these possible solutions to this ?

1 increase the weight ( would rather not do, feel 2lbs is enough)
2 reduce number of teeth on chrono ratchet ( make the flick last longer )
3 increase size of chrono pallet (flick will have more effect as it will be further from the shaft ?)
4 reduce the gearing of the gear train (at present about 10:1)
5 increase size of the drum that the weight is wound on (will produce more power but not last as long. Double diameter twice the power?))

could someone confirm above statement s are true
which is the best option ?
combinati on of all except 1 ?

feel I need to do something as spins will reduce when I add pattern arms ?



Any thoughts from those somewhat more experienc ed than myself would be appreciat ed, before next prototype is embarked upon.

Many thanks

Ian
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ArtF
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« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2015, 12:07:25 PM »

Hi Ian:

   Great work. Fun isnt it?

>>1 increase the weight ( would rather not do, feel 2lbs is enough)

   Nope, its not really about weight, in fact the lighter the better in many ways..

2 reduce number of teeth on chrono ratchet ( make the flick last longer )

   This can help, the fewer teeth the more push....

3 increase size of chrono pallet (flick will have more effect as it will be further from the shaft ?)

   No, not really, the energy of the push will be pretty much the same due to stroke distance change.

4 reduce the gearing of the gear train (at present about 10:1)

   Can help..but then you get less wind...

5 increase size of the drum that the weight is wound on (will produce more power but not last as long. Double diameter twice the power?))
 
   Same deal, less time.

    Your facing the same issue all clock makers face. You really need to consider the flywheel
 as a pendulum. Clockmake rs get lots of time by making the pendulum longer,
this slows it down. When you add arms it will get slower, simply as
a result of the radius growing.. ( pendulum gets longer..).
 Make that wheel the same weight but 3 foot round, and it will go much slower..
     Weight matters, but not like radius. Your flywheels resistanc e to
direction al change , or length of time is really a funciton of its rotationa l
inertia, which is the mass times the radius squared. I = MR^2;

  This formula tells you weight , while important, is subservie nt to radius
which has an exponenti al effect as its squared to the mass. So generally
you add weight to a pendulum to keep it from being too flimsy,and add length
to make it slow. OR, if the length is as long as you can have it, you then add weight..

Leastways ...thats what I do...

Art
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Ian
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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2015, 05:10:23 PM »

Thanks for all that Art

Know you are busy with Webcam stuff so thanks for taking the time



Ian
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ArtF
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2015, 05:23:46 PM »

anytime.. Smiley
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Ian
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« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2015, 10:48:36 AM »

still having fun  I think
added some simple arms

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTWIHosYgN0

as you can see only get about 90 deg swing from each impulse !!

still think I need more power from each impulse

No sure which of options 1-5 to try first maybe a mixture of them all


Ian
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ArtF
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« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2015, 12:41:50 PM »

Ian:

 Bit more weight maybe?

Art
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